Volume 3, Issue 6, November 2015, Page: 188-193
Eliciting Smallholder Farmers’ Tradeoffs and Preferences on the Attributes of Climate Smart Agriculture in the Breadbasket Areas of Tanzania Using a Conjoint Experiment Method
Kassim R. Mussa, Department of Physical Sciences, Sokoine University of Agriculture, Morogoro-Tanzania
Josephat A. Saria, Department of Environmental Studies, Open University of Tanzania, Dar es Salaam-Tanzania
Lughano J. M. Kusiluka, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Sokoine University of Agriculture, Morogoro-Tanzania
Noorali T. Jiwaji, Department of Environmental Studies, Open University of Tanzania, Dar es Salaam-Tanzania
Brown Gwambene, Institute of Resource Assessment, University of Dares Salaam, Dar es Salaam-Tanzania
Noah M. Pauline, Institute of Resource Assessment, University of Dares Salaam, Dar es Salaam-Tanzania
Nangware K. Msofe, Department of Environmental Studies, Open University of Tanzania, Dar es Salaam-Tanzania
Juma A. Tegeje, Department of Physical Sciences, Sokoine University of Agriculture, Morogoro-Tanzania
Innocent Messo, Department of Environmental Studies, Open University of Tanzania, Dar es Salaam-Tanzania
Sixbert S. Mwanga, Institute of Resource Assessment, University of Dares Salaam, Dar es Salaam-Tanzania
Received: Oct. 11, 2015;       Accepted: Oct. 26, 2015;       Published: Nov. 17, 2015
DOI: 10.11648/j.ijepp.20150306.12      View  3519      Downloads  76
Abstract
While policy and decision-makers are striving to enhance food security amidst maddening impacts of climate change, climate smart agriculture is thought of as a promising breakthrough for responding to climate change impacts in Tanzania and elsewhere in the world as it strives to increase food productivity; build resilience of agricultural systems to climate change impacts and reduce agricultural greenhouse gas emission. Studies show that agricultural sector is both, a cause and a victim of climate change. It significantly contributes greenhouse gases to the atmosphere. However, achieving climate change mitigation through agriculture without compromising food security is a huge policy and research challenge, some scientists say, it is practically impossible. This study sought to determine tradeoffs and preferences of smallholder farmers on the attributes climate smart agricultural practices, specifically modeling choices of smallholder farmers using choice experiment method. Upon estimating three different models, positive utilities were observed in high productivity, Moderate and low GHG emission as well as on moderate and high resilient farming systems. Smallholder farmers showed a complete disutility on low and moderate agricultural productivity, high GHG emission and low resilient farming systems. The models therefore justified the fact that, attaining more yield without a compromise in greenhouse gas emission reduction targets is a blue-sky dream. In order to concisely inform policy, more research on farmers’ preference and tradeoff on the attributes is needed to establish a scientific and logical progression about the tradeoffs people are willing to make with regard to the attributes of climate smart agriculture practices.
Keywords
Smallholder Farmers, Preference Modeling, Climate Smart Agriculture, Choice Experiment
To cite this article
Kassim R. Mussa, Josephat A. Saria, Lughano J. M. Kusiluka, Noorali T. Jiwaji, Brown Gwambene, Noah M. Pauline, Nangware K. Msofe, Juma A. Tegeje, Innocent Messo, Sixbert S. Mwanga, Eliciting Smallholder Farmers’ Tradeoffs and Preferences on the Attributes of Climate Smart Agriculture in the Breadbasket Areas of Tanzania Using a Conjoint Experiment Method, International Journal of Environmental Protection and Policy. Vol. 3, No. 6, 2015, pp. 188-193. doi: 10.11648/j.ijepp.20150306.12
Copyright
Copyright © 2015 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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